In Pennsylvania, unlawfully holding another person against his will is a serious offense and one of the more Violent Crimes of Unlawful Restraint. Violent Crimes such as this are known as Unlawful Restraint. Per the PA crimes code Title 18 section 2902(a), aggravated assault unborn child a person commits unlawful restraint if he knowingly restrains another unlawfully in circumstances exposing him to risk of serious bodily injury; or holds another person in a condition of involuntary servitude. If you commit this offense, you are committing a misdemeanor of the first degree. If found guilty, you face a possible penalty of up to five years imprisonment and/or fines up to $10,000. Per Title 18 section 2902(b), unlawful restraint of a minor where offender is not victim’s parent is a felony of the second degree. If you are found guilty, you face a potential penalty of up to ten years imprisonment and/or fines up to $25,000. These types of situations are common when it comes to events such as burglaries and home invasions.

Per Title 18 section 2902(c) of the PA crimes code, if you commit unlawful restraint of a minor and you are the victim’s parent, you are committing a felony of the second degree. If you are found guilty, you face a possible penalty of up to ten years imprisonment and/or fines up to $10,000. Simple Assault As defined in the statute, the term “parent” means a natural parent, stepparent, adoptive parent or guardian of a minor. Unlawful restraints of a minor where the offender is the victim’s parents is a very common when it comes to emotionally distressful situations such as an argument in a residence. It is also common in situations with divorced or separated parents. If you or someone you know is facing unlawful restraint charges it is important to contact a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. A criminal defense attorney will be able to evaluate the facts of the case and produce the best possible outcome for the case.​